poetry

projects

Yeah!

So after some fairly extensive discussion with a number of people about The State of Poetry., Donna and I have decided to really get moving on this stuff. We have ideas, we just need to put them in action.

One of the things I realized is that the series of bible poems I’ve been working on are good – but probably not interesting enough to sustain a reader through 60 or 70 pages of them. So I have decided that, instead of pushing for a full-length manuscript, I’ll stop the bible series around 20 poems (I already have nearly 15). Then I’m going to create mini-books – probably pocket sized – out of them, binding them in kivar, a material that was used pretty commonly to bind bibles. Donna is going to attempt to get me in touch with a professor she had who is into bookbinding – hopefully he can set me in the right direction, as I want to bind them myself. I’m looking at doing a limited edition of these, probably 40, which I’ll sell for only a couple bucks, rather than the $12 or $14 that my chapbook cost. I’m also going to investigate printing the poems on onionskin, to really mimic the feel of an old bible. (Do you know what onionskin bible pages are good for?)

And then I’m opening a dialogue with Jon the Artist about a potential collaboration. It hasn’t take shape yet, but I’m excited – the work he does is beautiful, and I can’t wait to see what happens.

And then there’s the possible collaboration with Donna Vorreyer, a poet I met last year at Peter Murphy’s Cape May Getaway. We have plans to meet up again in Cape May this year and discuss some ideas; I’m also totally stoked about that, as Donna’s work is striking and exciting.

I’m starting to feel good about this!

4 thoughts on “projects”

  1. I don’t know what onionskin paper is good for as far as cost, if that’s what you’re asking. I’m pretty sure the only thing it’s good for is for making huge-ass anthologies which seemed like they would take forever to read, but then take twice as long because the paper is so damn thin that it’s deceiving.

    Now that I’ve gotten the post-litt-studies rant out, I’m so excited about this! And please, please tell me that’s not any bookbinding professor, but the love of my academic life bookbinding professor. Because even when his name is just “professor who’s into bookbinding,” I still get all giggly.

  2. I don’t know what onionskin paper is good for as far as cost, if that’s what you’re asking. I’m pretty sure the only thing it’s good for is for making huge-ass anthologies which seemed like they would take forever to read, but then take twice as long because the paper is so damn thin that it’s deceiving.

    Now that I’ve gotten the post-litt-studies rant out, I’m so excited about this! And please, please tell me that’s not any bookbinding professor, but the love of my academic life bookbinding professor. Because even when his name is just “professor who’s into bookbinding,” I still get all giggly.

  3. Uh, I was actually thinking that onion skin bible pages are good for rolling joints. At least, that’s what we used to use them for in high school.

    And yes, it is that professor. 🙂

  4. Uh, I was actually thinking that onion skin bible pages are good for rolling joints. At least, that’s what we used to use them for in high school.

    And yes, it is that professor. 🙂

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